The U.S. Federal Health Insurance Explained in 10 Easy Steps – For 2013 and 2014.

July 17, 2013 Health Insurance Within Reach: As a public service to my readership, I’m giving you a bottom line look at health insurance for 2013 and 2014 in the United States: (See the Video here)

‘1. All Americans are required to have health Insurance, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (Effective January 1, 2014).

‘2. Insurers will no longer be permitted to deny coverage of pre-exiting conditions. (Effective January 01, 2014).

‘3. You will be able to purchase a policy through your states “Health Exchange” starting October 1, 2013 and running through March 31, 2014.

‘4. Financial assistance is available for those making less than $94,200 per year. This assistance is based upon Federal Poverty Guidelines.

‘5. Many Americans still don’t realize the A.C.A. is coming into effect, including 6 out of 10 low-income workers who especially stand to benefit.

‘6. Many low-income workers mistakenly believe the law has been overturned and few have any idea how they are to go about purchasing health insurance from the online exchanges being set up in each state — or that the federal government intends to help many of them pay for it.

‘7. The state exchanges are Web sites designed to make it possible to purchase health insurance if you don’t get it from your employer and will let consumers compare different options.

‘8. All health plans offered on a state exchange must provide comprehensive coverage that includes doctors’ visits, lab work, hospital stays, emergency room services, maternity care, prescriptions, mental health services and children’s dental and vision care. Presumably, this means fewer consumers will be stung by minimal coverage and unexpected denials — the fine print of health policies that everyone dreads.

‘9. Medicare, in the US, is a federal system of health insurance for people over 65 years of age and for certain younger people with disabilities.

’10. Medicaid, in the US, is a federal system of health insurance for those requiring financial assistance.

Many efforts are being made to simplify the process of buying insurance and to make the exchanges as user-friendly as possible:

‘A) The state exchanges are Web sites designed to make it possible to purchase health insurance if you don’t get it from your employer.

‘B) All health plans offered on a state exchange must provide comprehensive coverage that includes doctors’ visits, lab work, hospital stays, emergency room services, maternity care, prescriptions, mental health services and children’s dental and vision care. Presumably, this means fewer consumers will be stung by minimal coverage and unexpected denials — the fine print of health policies that everyone dreads.

‘C) Not all the plans will offer the same level of coverage. Shoppers will find four broad categories. Policies with the most generous benefits will be “platinum” plans; they will have the highest monthly premiums but fewer out-of-pocket costs and lower deductibles. The “gold” and “silver” plans will be somewhat less generous, while those in the “bronze” category will have the cheapest premiums but may require high out-of-pocket costs and deductibles.

‘D) The idea is that you will be able to make an apples-to-apples comparison of the prices, provider networks and other details to see which policy best fits your needs. Be aware that the plans may have narrow provider networks — your favorite doctor or the hospital down the street may not be a participant. You’ll need to check to see if a certain provider is in the network, advised Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reform.

‘E) The exchange should be able to tell you exactly what each plan will cost, given individual circumstances. Be prepared for sticker shock. A 40-year-old nonsmoker may be able to buy a plan for about $4,000 annually or less; someone in his or her 50s may pay double. “Health insurance is an incredibly expensive product,” Ms. Corlette warned. New Health Care Cost Calculator is here.

‘F) What many consumers don’t realize is that even if you earn well above the minimum wage, you may get help purchasing the policy you want. People who earn up to four times the federal poverty level — roughly $45,960 a year for a single person and $94,200 for a family of four — can receive subsidies to help pay for the new coverage. Those earning 250 percent of the poverty level are eligible for additional cost-sharing subsidies.

“The vast majority of currently uninsured are going to be eligible” for some form of subsidy, said Elisabeth Benjamin, vice president of health initiatives with the Community Service Society of New York.

To see if you’re eligible for subsidies, and what portion of the cost you will be expected to carry, try this calculator.

Americans who work at minimum wage jobs, earning less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level, which is $15,856 for a household of one and $32,499 for a household of four, will qualify for free government coverage under Medicaid — but only if they live in a state that is expanding its Medicaid program. List of what each state is doing on its Web site.

Medicaid is going to be the safety net for more people in the years to come. “It’s free, you don’t pay anything, it’s comprehensive and it turns out to be the easiest thing to apply for,” said Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The new system will be a radical departure from the byzantine and often bewildering insurance market we have now. Critics say the exchanges will cost the government a fortune, and warn that the plans may provide access only to a limited number of doctors and hospitals.

Supporters acknowledge that there will be glitches initially and that it may take a while to iron out all the details. And health insurance has never been cheap.

“Out-of-pocket costs are still high, even with the financial assistance,” said Jennifer Sullivan, of Enroll America, a nonprofit group that aims to get as many Americans coverage as possible. “People need to see it in context and realize the annual savings they are getting. That moves them to say, ‘Ah, this is a pretty good deal.’ ”

Open enrollment on the new exchanges will run from October 1 through March 31. You will not be able to sign up for insurance after March 31 unless your circumstances have changed, and you are suddenly without coverage because of a divorce or job loss.

Help will be available online or via telephone. Given how difficult insurance purchases have always been, many Americans are likely to need it. (By Roni C. Rabin for the New York Times).

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About wfoster2011

Disaster researcher and current financial and economic news and events: Accidents, economics, financial, news, nature, volcanoes, floods, earthquakes, fires; airplane, ship & train wrecks; tornadoes, mine cave-ins, hurricanes, pestilence, blizzards, storms, tzuami's, explosions, pollution, famine; heat & cold waves; nuclear accidents, drought, stampedes and general. Futures trader using high volume and open interest futures markets. Also, a financial, weather and mundane astrologer with over 30 years of experience. Three University degrees from California State University Northridge: BS - Accounting MS - Busines Administration BA - Psychology Served in the U. S. Army as an Armored Platoon Leader in the 5th Battalion, 68th Armored Regiment, 8th Infantry Division (Retired). Have published three books and 36 articles available for sale through my blog: Commodology - Secret of Soyobeans (Financial Astrology) Timing is the Key (Financial Astrology) Scum City, a fiction novel (no longer available, under contract to major publisher) Currently resident of Las Vegas, NV, USA
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2 Responses to The U.S. Federal Health Insurance Explained in 10 Easy Steps – For 2013 and 2014.

  1. Thank you much. I Facebooked it. There is such disinformation and spin on every issue in the US. The goal, of course, is a frustrated apathetic citizenry. This post empowers.

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